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Tag Archives: programming

Just started reading  (bits of)

Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

I thought this quote from the dedication section was beautiful:

“I think that it’s extraordinarily important that we in computer sci- ence keep fun in computing. When it started out, it was an awful lot of fun. Of course, the paying customers got shafted every now and then, and after a while we began to take their complaints se- riously. We began to feel as if we really were responsible for the successful, error-free perfect use of these machines. I don’t think we are. I think we’re responsible for stretching them, setting them off in new directions and keeping fun in the house. I hope the field of computer science never loses its sense of fun. Above all, I hope we don’t become missionaries. Don’t feel as if you’re Bible sales- men. The world has too many of those already. What you know about computing other people will learn. Don’t feel as if the key to successful computing is only in your hands. What’s in your hands, I think and hope, is intelligence: the ability to see the machine as more than when you were first led up to it, that you can make it more.”

—Alan J. Perlis (April 1, 1922 – February 7, 1990)

You can find the book to download here

I have been busy running through ideas for automated instruments I could use to enrich my performances at open mic nights. One of the main points of interest for me is percussion as it is usually quite over looked at open mic nights apart from the occasional set of bongos. I have been drawing up sketches for a snare drum played using dropping marbles and also for a cassette player hack. The main hurdle for any automated instrument is how will it be sequenced to play itself. Last night I sat down for a while and coded a very very basic sequencer in processing that controlled an Arduino with Firmata installed. There is nothing fancy about the code but I believe this will be a good solid starting point for most of the automated instruments I could ever imagine. There are some images below of the basic setup and a video of the sequencer on the screen and the Arduino carrying out the sequence using LED’s. I am quite happy to publish the source code on request.

Above is one of my Favorite examples I have seen so far of augmented reality. It was coded by Saqoosha who I am very thankful to as he was one of my main sources of information and documentation for the FLARToolkit.

The last two days I have spent bashing about with the FLARToolkit for AS3. Its very addictive and there are some very good example online. In the end I produced some working examples by mixing the examples given by Mikko Haapoja and saqoosha.net into one AS3 file. I can’t wait to see where these experiments will take me and i hopefully post them up here soon.

Recently i have been working alot with processing which if you have not tried i really guarantee it for image manipulation, real time web cam tracking and general interaction experiments. Part of an applet i recently wanted to produce involved shapes flaying out of the bottom of the screen. These objects must obey gravity and act like real objects when you throw them in the air. These sort of behavior is know as projectile motion. I am no mathematician by any standards but i found this brilliant tutorial on the subject of projectile motion. I worked through from the very beginning and was easily able to produce this effect. Its a very very good tutorial and i went through a lot of complicated mind boggling sites to find it. So if your interested in this subject the try this:

Projectile Tutorial

Don’t rush through it because the beginning parts are vital to understanding the last parts.

image from the Kitty throw game; bored try it!

This is a very poetic project and a very beautiful idea. The author and creator of the program decided it would be nice to have a way to convert the beauty of the retina in an eye in to music. He’s Using Processing as the backbone and creating OSC which are then picked up by SuperCollider.

I have not looked at SuperCollider yet but it does look like an excellent piece of software for producing real-time audio synthesis and algorithmic composition. So watch out in the future for experiments on my blog using this software.

heres the video showing the EyeSequencer:

this project was found on Makezine.com

Makezine found this project on: http://blog.califaudio.com

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